Federal Laws Part I. – Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA)

I haven’t posted on the blog for a long time, but there is a reason why. Lately I’ve been working on a study about the legal classification of the Terms of Service on social media sites. It has finally been published (yet only in Hungarian) and I had the opportunity to present my findings for the first time on a conference for PhD students. I will definitely share my thoughts about this topic on this site in the future, but now I would like to focus on the main subject of the blog, the legal aspects of online data after death. More precisely, on the effective federal laws in the United States, which refer to this issue.

Generally, we can declare there are three federal laws in the USA, which are connected to our topic in an outstanding degree:

  • Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA)
  • Electronic Communication Privacy Act (ECPA)
  • Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act (RUFADAA)

RUFADAA is a federal law enacted by 24 member states at the moment, and it is a law regulating entirely the issue of how relatives (fiduciaries) can get access to the digital assets of their deceased loved one. I know that this is a key law of understanding the topic I am writing my posts about but as a good poker player I would like to delay my trump card for a later post. It is also important to get to know the other two federal laws.

This time I would like to introduce the importance of Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA) was enacted by Congress in 1986 as an amendment to existing computer fraud law, which had been included in the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984. This law has been made to prevent attacks against „protected computers”. At the beginning, this definition was applicable only for computers used by the US Government and its authorities.  It is basically a criminal law, but from 1994 private individuals and companies have the opportunity to start a legal action against the violators of this law.

CFAA name 7 different types of action which can be criminalized by this law. One is really important from our aspect: not only the access of a computer without authorization is a crime, but the exceeding the authorization also. Why is it important for us?

Because service providers often refer to this part of the CFAA when they refuse the request of leftovers for access to the online data of their deceased relative.  They would commit a crime by exceeding the authorization they get from the deceased person for storing their data and give access to the relatives. Naturally, there is no chance to get authorization from the “owner” of these data, unless there are provisions in the will about this problem.

Next time, I am going to introduce the connection of Electronic Communication Privacy Act to the topic of online data after death. And I promise it won’t take 3 and a half months again.

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